Former Comfort Women Sold by Koreans
Former Comfort Women Sold by Koreans

In the WWII era, Imperial Japan occupied what is today known as North and South Korea. During that time, the Amy recruited women to work in wartime brothels called comfort stations. Here, women who sexually serviced the Imperial Army were recruited through a variety of methods including newspaper advertisements and word-of-mouth.

 

In addition, many Koreans sold their wives and daughters to the Imperial Army for monetary gain. Some of the testimonies of the former Comfort Women changed variably depending on the interviewer, such as stories told in testimony to the UN Special Rapporteur for the official report on Comfort Women. Some of their stories are recorded below:

 

Kim Sun-ok

In an interview with Professor Chunghee Sarah Soh of San Francisco State University, a former Korean comfort woman Kim Sun-ok said that she was sold by her parents four times.

Kim testified before UN Special Rapporteur Radhika Coomaraswamy that she was abducted by the Japanese military.

 

Mun Ok-chu

“I was recruited by a Korean comfort station owner. I saved a considerable amount of money from tips, so I opened a saving account. I could not believe that I could have so much money in my saving account. One of my friends collected many jewels, so I went and bought a diamond.  I often went to see Japanese movies and Kabuki plays in which players came from the mainland Japan. I became a popular woman in Rangoon. There were a lot more officers in Rangoon than near the frontlines, so I was invited to many parties. I sang songs at parties and received lots of tips. I put on a pair of high heels, a green coat and carried an alligator leather handbag. I swaggered about in a fashionable dress. No one in town could guess that I was a comfort woman. I felt very happy and proud. I received permission to return home, but I didn’t want to go back to Korea. I wanted to stay in Rangoon.”

According to Professor Ahn Byong Jik of Seoul University, Mun Oku-chu continued to work as a prostitute after the war.

 

Kim Hak-sun

In an interview with Korean newspaper The Hankyoreh (the article was published on May 15th, 1991)  a former Korean comfort woman Kim Hak-sun said that she was sold to the Japanese by her mother.

In 1993 Kim Hak-sun told Professor Ahn Byong Jik of Seoul University, “My mother sent me to train as a Geisha in Pyongyang and then sold me.”

Kim testified before UN Special Rapporteur Radhika Coomaraswamy that she was abducted by the Japanese military.

 

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